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Source: www.asiaecon.org |

COUNTRIES WITH DIFFERENT APPROACHES TO NORTH KOREA


The president of the United States, Barack Obama has announced his plan of a rigid position over North Korea's nuclear arsenal due to the country's unwillingness to cooperate and limit nuclear programs. President Obama will attempt to pressure North Korea to comply with its efforts to limit the production of nuclear weapons through trade intervention.


U.S and North Korea

The president of the United  States, Barack Obama has announced his plan of a rigid position over North Korea’s nuclear arsenal due to the country’s unwillingness to cooperate and limit nuclear programs. President Obama will attempt to pressure North Korea to comply with its efforts to limit the production of nuclear weapons through trade intervention.

The United Nations Security Council met to discuss what should be done about the North Korean threat. The United Nation’s verdict was to have the U.S Navy inspect suspicious North Korean vessels to make sure they would not be carrying banned cargo.  Other vessels traveling to and from North   Korea will also be subject to inspection as well. The agreement prohibits shipments of all weaponry except small arms and prevents the North from delivering nuclear and missile technology to other countries where it could pose a threat to the U.S and its allies, according to Geoff Morrell, the Pentagon’s press secretary. He added that arms shipments have been a significant source of revenue for North Korea for a long time now. Stifling this revenue would reduce funding for Pyongyang’s nuclear program and stop the distribution of arms to other countries and terrorists.

The U.S plans to take on new disciplinary support to wring revenue and intrude transfers of arms and nuclear technology in and out of North Korea. Mr. Obama has said that in the past, North Korea has engaged in aggressive behavior and was then rewarded with foodstuffs and fuel, among other benefits. Now, he wants to change the pattern and meet the threat with “serious enforcement of sanctions that are in place”.

Susan Rice, U.S ambassador warned that Obama’s challenge can spur other rebellious acts from North   Korea. U.S intelligence officials suggest that perhaps Pyongyang might respond with yet another nuclear test, especially after the country promised to build more atomic bombs and start enriching uranium for a new nuclear weapons program in response to the most recent UN sanction on Saturday, June 13.

Russia, China and North Korea

Russia and China urged North Korea to renegotiate its decision to continue pursuing nuclear programs immediately after North Korea’s threat of a “thousand-fold” military retaliation against the U.S and its allies if provoked. Their role is currently described as “moderators in the dispute”. Russia and China want to resolve disagreements through dialogue and consultations, according to a statement.

North Korea’s key trading partner is China. China “has pledged to implement tougher sanctions against North Korea, which were approved by the UN last week.” These sanctions include careful inspection of ships suspected of taking banned cargo to and from North Korea, and increased ban on arms sales.

Japan and North Korea

Japan has banned exports to North   Korea in response to their nuclear and missile tests in May, with the purpose of sending a “strong message”.

“What’s most important is that North Korea make the right response… to Japan’s strong message, even though there are people who point out the volume of exports is small,” said Chief Cabinet Secretary Takeo Kawamura.

The Japanese concern arises from the proximity of the country, since much of its territory could be hit by North Korean mid-range missiles, according to the BBC’s Roland Buerk in Tokyo.

In sum, there issues that the U.S, China, Russia, South Korea, Japan, the European Union, Canada and North Korea have to discuss regarding Pyongyang’s nuclear program. Otherwise, the world will continue facing the North Korean threat: “If the U.S. and its followers infringe upon our republic’s sovereignty even a bit, our military and people will launch a one hundred- or one thousand-fold retaliation with merciless military strike,” the government-run Minju Joson newspaper said in a commentary.

Source: www.asiaecon.org |


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